Tag Archives: lan guard

A tale of two security approaches – and why you need both

Once upon a time, attacks on computers and networks were relatively simple. Our primary worry was viruses and their variants – worms, Trojans, rootkits. Their authors set out with malicious intent, to create software that can cause harm by shutting down a system or an entire network, destroying data and/or programs, or collect information and send it back to the attackers.
Continue reading

Windows XP – where have all the bad guys gone?

April 8, 2014 has come and gone and you may be wondering what all the fuss was about. After all, the bad guys haven’t come out of hiding, wreaking havoc on those who still have instances of Windows XP running on their networks.
Continue reading

Target’s tale: Lesson learned or will you be burned?

Written by: March Thaler

Turn back the clock to late last year. At the height of theshutterstock_125177096-300x255 holiday season, between November 27 and December 15, hackers certainly gave new meaning to the term “hit the bull’s-eye!”

Cybercriminals toyed with retail giant Target, known for the circular red and white logo that symbolizes its name. Information from 40 million guest debit and credit card accounts was stolen – or so it was thought. The initial estimate, already among the largest in U.S. corporate history, turned out to be a fraction of the total. Today, it ranges from 70 million to 110 million, depending on reports.
Continue reading

51 Things You Need to Stop Doing Now

Written by: Christina Goggi

Here’s a list of 51 things you need to stop doing NOW. Parse this list, and if anything on it lines up with how things are done in your environment, stop it. Trust me on this. Each and every one of these things is bad, wrong, or even dangerous, and while it may seem like the simple thing to do right now, it is going to cost you much more in the long term.

1. Using default passwords

It takes 10 seconds to change the password on any device. Do it, or don’t be surprised when someone owns your access points, or your printers start to display “Insert Coins to Continue…”

2. Using password policies that are either too strong or too weak

Password length, complexity, and expiration requirements should strike a balance between security and functionality. A password that must be changed every 30 days is probably excessive, and will lead to admins ticking the box so their password never expires. Not requiring complexity makes it trivial to brute force or crack using simple dictionary methods. You should neither assume you won’t be a target, nor think you work for the NSA when setting the password policy for your users.

3. Forcing password patterns

Continue reading

BCW#419: 10 Tips To Keep Your Network Safe -Understanding IT Threats – Protecting Your Data

The Business Computing Weekly Podcast Episode # 419

This episode, the focus of the podcast turns to keeping your network safe and protecting your data. The following are discussed.

1. Hackers Vs. Crackers. Threats come from many sources including your employees
2: Be careful of movie devices, and BYOD (Bring your Own Devices).
3. The ongoing battle of Zero Day attacks
4. 95.6% of mobile devices users put company data at risk by using public wifi
5. Reasons to develop a layered security approach
6 Crackers are taking advantage of social networks
7. The responsibility that comes with large amounts of storage
8. Keeping patch management front and center in your policies
9. Thoughts about “Shoulder Surfing”
10. 32% of IT Admins do not test their backup solutions
11. When employees of rogue. Stealth technologies in the workplace.

Links:

GFI Backup Survey
Content Filtering
Patch Management
Securing End Points

 

Hackers Find the Internet a Target-Rich Environment Thanks to Poor Patch Management

You would think that with things like automatic updates, applicationshackers-poor-patch-management that can automatically patch themselves, and the constant media attention towards security, hackers would be a dying breed, bereft of targets which they can exploit. Unfortunately, poor patch management practices across the board means that the ever-growing number of connected devices are providing hackers with and endless supply of fresh victims. Continue reading